Live and digital engagement in arts and culture

This section collates research that asks questions about how people interact with culture in the digital realm. This is a relatively new area of research, which explains why this is a relatively small section in CultureCase. More studies should emerge in the coming year, especially given the work occurring through the Digital R&D Fund for the Arts.

The summaries in this category are:

Understanding online museum communities

This research was conducted by Tien-Li Chen, Wei-Chun Lai and Tai-Kuei Yu at National Taipei University of Technology and National Quemoy University, Taiwan

Summary

This paper uses a survey of students in Taiwan to understand how best to create emotionally resonant and engaging experiences with online museum communities. The survey was …

How Instagram artists promote mental health awareness

This research was conducted by Frances J. Griffith and three others at Bowling Green State University, USA

Summary

Instagram is a popular social networking site which has revolutionised the way that artists express themselves and connect with audiences. Although the platform is mainly about the sharing of images, each post can …

Using Shakespeare to exert soft power and online cultural diplomacy

This research was conducted by Billur Aslan Ozgul and three others at Brunel University London and three other institutions

Summary

This paper is based on a study of the global Twitter campaign to promote the British Council’s Shakespeare Lives programme. It analysed a corpus of 4,722 tweets in five …

How street performers attract income online

This research was conducted by Meg Elkins and Tim R. L. Fry at RMIT University, Australia

Summary

This paper looks at how buskers and street performers can use a digital platform to attract donations for their work. This is increasingly important as digital transactions are replacing the exchange of paper money …

The popularity of Spotify playlists changes according to the time of day or night

This research was conducted by Ole Adrian Heggli, Jan Stupacher and Peter Vuust at Aarhus University and The Royal Academy of Music Aarhus/Aalborg, Denmark

Summary

Human life is governed by diurnal cycles – the never-ending sequence of day/night, light/dark, wake/sleep. This research analysed the way in which people …

The 'digital turn' taken during COVID was unsustainable

This research was conducted by Ole Marius Hylland at Telemark Research Institute, Norway

Summary

This paper charts the way that the cultural sector in Norway took a ‘digital turn’ during the first 100 days of the 2020 COVID-19 lockdown in Norway. The research was a rapid response to the crisis – gathering …

Understanding online behaviour of rock music fans

This research was conducted by Alicia Perkins at the University of Newcastle, Australia

Summary

Online social media is known to be one of the most important ways that music fans communicate with each other to maintain, express and enhance their identity as fans. This paper looked at the posts to a …

By | 2 October 2018 |

Understanding the emotional response to museum activities

This research was conducted by Carmen Camarero-Izquierdo, María José Garrido-Samaniego and Rebeca Silva-García at the University of Valladolid, Spain.

Summary 

Museum activities can be positive and pleasurable experiences, which generate emotions. However, there is little research about how and why activities taking place in the museum impact upon visitors’ feelings. This …

By | 24 July 2018 |

Using digital platforms for deeper and richer engagement with arts audiences

This research was conducted by Ben Walmsley at the University of Leeds, UK

Summary

The paper describes a project that used a bespoke online platform to allow the public to commission, interact with and reflect upon two dance performances at Yorkshire Dance in Leeds, a city in northern England. The research …

By | 9 February 2017 |

Understanding the audience at a jazz and blues festival

This research was conducted by Karen Burland at the University of Leeds and Stephanie E. Pitts at the University of Sheffield, UK

Summary

This study set out to examine audience participation and engagement in a well-established jazz and blues festival held annually in Edinburgh. The festival audience had high expectations of …

By | 19 January 2017 |