Keyword: experiment

Music listening enhances recovery and mood after stroke

This research was conducted by Teppo Särkämö and 11 others from universities in Finland and Canada

Summary

A group of patients who had suffered arterial stroke had improved cognitive abilities and better mood after listening to music compared to patients who listened to audio books or did not listen to any …

By | 27 June 2016 |

Music activities benefit dementia patients and their carers

This research was conducted by Teppo Särkämö and six others at universities in Finland and the USA

Summary

Dementia is increasing worldwide, and with it the demand for low-cost and effective interventions to address both the symptoms and the reduced quality of life associated with the condition. This Finnish study showed …

By | 13 June 2016 |

Reading literary fiction improves emotion recognition

This research was conducted by Jessica E. Black and Jennifer L. Barnes at the University of Oklahoma, USA

Summary

This study aimed to replicate previous findings that have shown reading literary fiction to enhance people’s Theory of Mind (the ability to infer and reason about our own and others’ beliefs …

By | 6 June 2016 |

Group singing improves the mental health of older adults

This research was conducted by Simon Coulton, Stephen Clift, Ann Skingley and John Rodriguez at the University of Kent, Canterbury Christ Church University and NHS Kent and Medway, UK

Summary

Older adults who took part in a community singing group had significantly improved scores in aspects of mental health compared to …

By | 18 February 2016 |

Music reduces stress during medical procedures

This research was conducted by N. Schneider, M. Schedlowski, T. H. Schürmeyer and H. Becke at Hannover Medical School, Germany

Summary

Hospital tests and treatments can be extremely stressful for patients, which can lead to pain, medical complications and unreliable test results. Tests used to diagnose serious medical conditions often involve …

By | 28 January 2016 |

Group music training improves children's pro-social skills

This research was conducted by E. Glenn Schellenberg, Kathleen A. Coriggall, Sebastian P. Dys and Tina Malti at the University of Toronto Mississauga, Canada

Summary

This study investigated whether group music training in early childhood is associated with improved pro-social skills. The researchers followed 38 Canadian eight- and nine-year olds over …

By | 14 January 2016 |

Dance raises your pain threshold and aids social bonding

This research was conducted by Bronwyn Tarr, Jacques Launay, Emma Cohen and Robin Dunbar at the University of Oxford, UK

Summary

Dance is a common cultural activity in which participants exert themselves in synchrony with music and with one another. Dancing is thought to help in the building of social bonds …

By | 7 January 2016 |

Word-of-mouth shapes teenage music consumption

This research was conducted by Noémi Berlin, Anna Bernard and Guillaume Fürst at the University of Edinburgh, UK; the University of Paris I (Panthéon Sorbonne), France and the University of Geneva, Switzerland

Summary

This paper looked at the role of price and marketing on the popularity of songs in the commercial …

By | 4 January 2016 |

How art changes your brain

This research was conducted by Anne Bolwerk and four others at University Hospital Erlangen and Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany

Summary

Looking at art can invoke strong emotions, but can it actually change the connections you make in your brain? Researchers in Germany recruited 28 adults and randomly assigned them into either evaluating …

By | 7 December 2015 |

Reading fiction is related to developing empathic skills

This research was conducted by P. Matthijs Bal and Martijn Veltkamp at VU University Amsterdam and FrieslandCampina, Deventer, The Netherlands

Summary

This study reports two experiments designed to measure changes in readers’ empathic skills over one week by getting participants to read either fiction or non-fiction writing. In the fiction groups …

By | 11 December 2014 |