Keyword: survey

Frequent attendance at cultural events associated with reduced cancer mortality

This research was conducted by Lars Olov Bygren and five others at Universities in Sweden, Norway and the USA.

Summary

This paper describes a long-term study looking at correlations between taking part in certain cultural activities and cancer mortality. In general, people in urban areas who frequently attended cultural events (cinemas …

By | 10 July 2017 |

Singing and dancing in groups is associated with increased wellbeing

This research was conducted by Melissa K. Weinberg and Dawn Joseph at Deakin University, Australia

Summary

This study found that people who dance to music or attend musical events have higher levels of subjective wellbeing compared to people that do not. Singing with others was also found to be associated with …

By | 22 June 2017 |

Factors that shape the frequency of attending arts and heritage activities

This research was conducted by Mart Willekens and John Lievens at Ghent University, Belgium

Summary

This paper assesses the role of cultural capital, economic and social factors and time pressure on engaging in arts and heritage activities. It also analyses the difference between non-attendees and attendees, as well as the frequency …

By | 9 March 2017 |

Delving into the ways that education shapes cultural engagement

This research was conducted by Natascha Notten, Bram Lancee, Herman G. van de Werfhorst and Harry B. G. Ganzeboom at four different universities in the Netherlands

Summary

There are two contrasting explanations for why levels of cultural engagement vary according to education levels within populations. One states that people come to …

By | 6 March 2017 |

How much arts engagement is needed to enhance wellbeing?

This research was conducted by Christina Davies, Matthew Knuiman and Michael Rosenberg at the University of Western Australia

Summary

Many clinical studies have shown arts-based therapies to reduce anxiety and depression and improve quality of life. This study sought to examine the relationship between recreational arts engagement and mental wellbeing in …

By | 23 January 2017 |

Understanding the audience at a jazz and blues festival

This research was conducted by Karen Burland at the University of Leeds and Stephanie E. Pitts at the University of Sheffield, UK

Summary

This study set out to examine audience participation and engagement in a well-established jazz and blues festival held annually in Edinburgh. The festival audience had high expectations of …

By | 19 January 2017 |

Museum visitors: two types of motivation

This research was conducted by Juan Gabriel Brida, Chiara Dalle Nogare and Raffaele Scuderi at the Free University of Bolzano-Bozen, University of Brescia and University of Enna “Kore”, Italy

Summary

Of all the drivers of museum attendance, “motivation” has rarely been systematically assessed. The aim of this study was to understand …

By | 23 June 2016 |

Smart women, rich men, no kids: couples’ arts engagement in Italy

This research was conducted by Elizabetta Lazzaro and Carlofilippo Frateschi at HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, Netherlands and University of Padua, Italy

Summary

This paper explored how much the arts occupied the time of couples, both separately and together. The analysis took in both attending arts events (e.g. going …

By | 16 June 2016 |

Changing patterns of musical tastes

This research was conducted by Omar Lizardo and Sara Skiles at the University of Notre Dame, USA

Summary

This paper looked at differences in people’s music taste across age groups and over time in the USA. The researchers concentrated on the phenomenon of ‘symbolic exclusion’: namely, the propensity of people …

By | 21 March 2016 |

Playing a musical instrument increases educational attainment

This research was conducted by Philip Yang at Eberhard Karls University, Germany

Summary

This research used a survey of German teenagers to investigate the relationship between educational attainment and playing a musical instrument, either in early childhood or during one’s teenage years. The survey asked a sample of 17 year-olds …

By | 2 March 2016 |