Keyword: survey

Lowering the cost of attendance does not necessarily increase accessibility for arts events

This research was conducted by Jessica Sherrod Hale and Joanna Woronkowicz at Indiana University, USA

Summary

This paper looked at the effects of arts programming at a large university campus in the United States. In 2016 Indiana University made a big investment in on-campus arts programming, including festivals with performances, film …

Using theatre to engage people in neuroscience and criminal justice

This research was conducted by Robert Blakey at the University of Oxford

Summary

This paper looked at whether people’s attitude to youth justice can be changed by watching a play about neuroscience. After watching the play, people recommended a slightly higher age of criminal responsibility than is currently the case …

Pursuing social cohesion via the arts in rural communities

This research was conducted by Hanne Otte at the University of Antwerp, Belgium.

Summary

This paper examined arts engagement in the Netherlands, particularly in the rural province of Drenthe. Through a series of interviews and surveys it arrived at two main findings. The first finding was a correlation between experiencing ‘confirmative …

Three big ideas for diversifying arts audiences

This research was conducted by Birgit Regina Mandel at the University of Hildesheim, Germany.

Summary

This paper charts an initiative called 'Intercultural Audience Development' designed to broaden and diversify the audiences for elite arts institutions in Germany. It found that diversification only happens when changes are made to the programming and …

The different ways that education and income influence arts attendance

This research was conducted by Sara Suarez‐Fernandez, Juan Prieto‐Rodriguez, and Maria Jose Perez‐Villadoniga at the University of Oviedo, Spain

Summary

This paper disentangles the relationship between income and education in the way that both influence the likelihood of engaging in the arts. Consistent with other research in this …

The arts engagement barriers faced by those with anxiety or depression

This research was conducted by Daisy Fancourt, Louise Baxter and Fabiana Lorencatto at University College London

Summary

This paper explored ‘barriers to engagement in participatory arts activities amongst people with either depression or anxiety’. Active participation in the arts is known to generate a mixture of positive outcomes: it often makes …

Music education promotes lifelong engagement with the arts

This research was conducted by Kenneth Elpus at the University of Maryland, USA

Summary

This paper sought to ‘understand the effects of school-based music education on later adult engagement with the arts using nationally representative data from the United States’. It found that ‘both music performance and music appreciation courses are …

Reading for work or study increases the likelihood of reading for pleasure but reduces the time allocated to it

This research was conducted by Sara Suarez‐Fernandez and David Boto‐García at the University of Oviedo, Spain

Summary

This paper describes the reading habits of adults in Spain, with a focus on the way in which reading for work or study affects how people read for pleasure. The results …

Frequent participation in the performing arts is associated with better mental health

This research was conducted by Eryn Piper Block and three others at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA

Summary

This study tracked young adults in America to discover that frequent participation in the performing arts was associated with positive mental health. The same was not true for writing or visual …

The wellbeing benefits of theatre attendance later in life

This research was conducted by Suzanne Meeks, Russell J. Vandenbroucke and S. Kelly Shryock at the University of Louisville, USA

Summary

This paper looked at the impact of theatre attendance on the wellbeing of a group of Americans aged over 60. The researchers found that attending live theatre ‘may contribute significantly …

By | 9 February 2021 |