Consumer behaviour in arts and culture

This section looks at how people engaging in arts and culture tend to behave as consumers: how they make decisions about ticket purchases, how they may be encouraged to spend more, how they interact with one another, and how they use cultural spaces.

The summaries in this category are:

Children can be key decision-makers in whether or not families visit museums

This research was conducted by Kai-Lin Wu, Kirsten Holmes and John Tribe at the University of Surrey, UK and Curtin University, Australia

Summary

This paper reports the findings from research into how and why families decide to visit museums. The research is based on interviews with museum-goers in Taiwan. The interviews …

By | 11 April 2014 |

The artistic experience is not created for the consumer, but co-created with them

This research was conducted by Miranda Boorsma at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Summary

This paper charts the theories that have underpinned arts marketing in the last 20 years. It suggests that incorporating contemporary aesthetic philosophy could lead to a radical shift in arts marketing practice. Rather than allowing either …

By | 20 March 2014 |

Word-of-mouth and reviews make the biggest difference to people’s theatre-going choices

This research was conducted by José María Grisolía and Ken Willis at Newcastle University, UK

Summary

The paper describes a study that examined how people in northeast England made decisions about what theatre performances to attend. Word-of-mouth and reviews were the most significant factors determining whether or not people chose to …

By | 16 March 2014 |